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13 ‘Affordable’ Apartments Up for Grabs, Need About $70K Income to Apply

38-35 Crescent St. in Long Island City (NYC Housing Connect)

May 7, 2021 By Allie Griffin

Two affordable housing lotteries are now open in Long Island City and Astoria, but only to people who make at least $68,500 a year.

In total, 13 apartments are up for grabs across the two apartment buildings — which are both located on Crescent Street. To be eligible for the lotteries, residents must make 130 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI).

There are six units available in a newly constructed building at 38-35 Crescent St., with three one bedrooms and three two bedrooms.

The one-bedroom units are open to households of one to three people who make between $72,858 and $139,620 combined annually. Rent costs $2,125 a month.

Three two-bedroom units are open to households of two to five people who make between $86,572 and $167,570 combined annually. Rent costs $2,525 a month.

A breakdown of the full income requirements is below.

Income requirements for the affordable units at 38-35 Crescent St. (NYC Housing Connect)

Tenants must pay for electricity, including the cost of heat, in addition to rent.

The Long Island City building owner is offering three months of rent free on initial leases, according to the NYC Housing Connect site. The building offers a host of amenities such as an elevator, laundry room, parking garage and roof deck.

The deadline to apply for the lottery is May 14, 2021. Mailed-in applications must be postmarked by that date. Those eligible can apply to the housing lottery online here.

30-82 Crescent St. in Astoria (NYC Housing Connect)

There are also seven units available through the lottery at 30-82 Crescent St. in Astoria.

One studio apartment is available for $2,000 a month to households of one to two people who make between $68,572 and $124,150 combined annually.

Five one-bedroom units are available for $2,200 a month to households of one to three people who make between $75,429 and $139,620 combined annually.

One two-bedroom unit is available for $2,823 a month to households of two to five people who make between $96,789 and $167,570 combined annually.

A breakdown of the full income requirements is below.

Income requirements for 30-82 Crescent St. in Astoria (NYC Housing Connect)

Tenants must pay for electricity, including the cost of running heat and the electric stovetop, in addition to rent. Rent includes the cost of gas for hot water.

The building includes an array of amenities such as an elevator, laundry room, gym and rooftop terrace.

The deadline to apply for the lottery is May 18, 2021. Those eligible can apply to the housing lottery online here.

The building owners will both receive a tax break for offering the affordable housing.

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2 Comments

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Betty

Astoria, LIC, most of Brooklyn is jumping the shark. If NYC wants to treat the working class this way and continue to overdevelop luxury apartments with unaffordable units, you will see them leave and you won’t have anyone serving your meal at that fancy restaurant. City Council, DeBozo, and NYC Dept of Buildings. #corruptcity

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JQ LLC

Great, more luxury public housing (make that ugly and gaudy public housing) for people who don’t need government assistance to find apartments as thousands of low income earners continue to get shafted by the city’s segregation and gentrification affordable housing program.

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