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Filipino Street Food Franchise Opens in Woodside’s Little Manila

Dollar Hits located at 39-04 64th Street (Instagram)

Aug. 23, 2022 By Czarinna Andres

A popular California-based restaurant that sells Filipino street food has opened a location in Woodside’s Little Manila.

Dollar Hits, which has two locations in Los Angeles, has opened a restaurant in the heart of Little Manila at 39-04 64th Street.

The eatery is near other popular Filipino chains, such as Jollibee and Red Ribbon Bakeshop.

The owners consist of three sisters—Elvie Chan, Josephine Estoesta and Nelita Deguia—who hail from Pampanga, a province North of Manila. They held a grand opening Saturday.

Dollar Hits is best known for its grilled skewers, where it offers more than 30 varieties for a $1.50 each. The varieties include mainstream offerings such as chicken and pork, to quintessential Filipino items such as “isaw,” a skewer of grilled pork intestines, “adidas,” which is grilled chicken feet, or “kwek kwek,” which is battered quail eggs.

They skewers were originally priced at $1—as in “Dollar Hits”— when the business first opened in 2013 in California. The Woodside location is selling the skewers for $1.50 due to the higher operating costs

Grilled chicken bbq (Instagram: Dollar Hits)

Aside from the skewers, the restaurant also offers other popular Filipino street foods such as the “Balut,” a fertilized duck egg, “turon,” a fried banana with jackfruit and caramel, and “ukoy,” a fried shrimp and vegetable fritter.

There are other items on the menu that include rice dishes and breakfast combos starting at $8. Authentic Filipino dishes such as Dinuguan are also on offer. Dinuguan is a Filipino savory stew usually of pork offal simmered in a rich, spicy dark gravy of pig blood, garlic, chili, and vinegar.

Dollar Hits took over two adjacent storefronts–the former Nepalese restaurant, Sumnima Kitchen and the former Habibi Deli. The restaurant has capacity for 30 customers indoors and can cater to another 30 outdoors.

Opening hours are Tuesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to midnight.

Pork Isaw (Photo: Instagram: Dollar Hits)

 

 

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