You are reading

Forest Hills Concert Raises Enough Money to Help Charity Feed Nearly 2.5 Million New Yorkers

Sept. 27, 2021 By Allie Griffin

A Forest Hills concert featuring hip hop artists Nas and DJ Cassidy last week raised enough money to help a local charity feed nearly 2.5 million New Yorkers for a day.

All proceeds from the ‘Concert to Feed NYC’ on Sept. 23 at Forest Hills Stadium were donated to City Harvest, the city’s largest food rescue organization.

The concert was headlined by the Grammy-winning performer and former Queens resident Nas following the release of his chart-topping album King’s Disease II.

Native New Yorker and record producer DJ Cassidy kicked off the concert with an hour-long set celebrating New York.

The fundraising concert was hosted at a time when many New York City families are struggling to put food on the table.

The number of New Yorkers lacking food surged across the city during the pandemic.

More than 1.5 million New Yorkers now experience food insecurity — a 38 percent increase over pre-pandemic figures. Furthermore, 1 in 3 children in NYC are now food insecure, according to City Harvest.

The concert was held to support City Harvest’s efforts to ensure that no New Yorker has to worry about where his or her next meal is coming from. The proceeds will help the organization deliver nutritious food during a time of historic food insecurity.

“We are grateful to our longtime friend Nas and to DJ Cassidy for partnering with City Harvest to raise enough funds to help us feed nearly 2.5M New Yorkers struggling to put meals on their tables due to the pandemic,” Jilly Stephens, CEO of City Harvest, said in a statement. “At a moment when food insecurity rates continue to be at record highs throughout our city, we are proud to partner with them to bring fresh, nutritious food to thousands of families across the five boroughs.”

Nas, who was raised in the Queensbridge Houses, was also awarded an official Key to the Borough.

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards honored the recording artist and 10 frontline City Harvest workers after the concert.

Richards also officially made Sept. 23, 2021 “Nas Day” in the borough.

email the author: [email protected]
No comments yet

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

‘Limitless possibility’: BP Richards announces community visioning workshops on redevelopment of Creedmoor Psychiatric Center campus in Queens Village

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. and Empire State Development on Tuesday, Jan. 31, announced the launch of a series of community visioning workshops that will be held to hear input from eastern Queens residents about the redevelopment of the 50-acre Creedmoor Psychiatric Center campus in Queens Village. 

The first community visioning workshop will be held on Thursday, Feb. 2, at 7 p.m. at P.S./I.S. 208 located at 74-30 Commonwealth Blvd. in Glen Oaks.

‘He didn’t deserve to die’: Borough President Richards leads emotional candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols

Queens Borough President Donovan Richards held a candlelight vigil for Tyre Nichols outside Queens Borough Hall Monday, Jan. 30 after Nichols’ death at the hands of police officers in Memphis, Tenn., made national headlines for the brutality in which the officers beat him.

Almost immediately after news broke about Nichols’ death, the Memphis police officers who beat him to death were fired and charged with murder. The police department released the body cam footage of the fatal beating on Jan. 27, but many people, including some at the vigil, have refused to watch it due to its extremely graphic nature.

Op-Ed: This Year’s State Budget Must Prioritize Climate, Jobs, and Justice for New York

Op-Ed, Jan. 30, By Assemblymember Jessica González-Rojas

In a time of rampant economic inequality and environmental injustice, it is easy to feel defeated.  Here in Queens and across New York State, however, communities are organizing for a better future. New Yorkers from different backgrounds and with different lived experiences are proving that we can build community, organize, and create a future that reflects our shared values.