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Long Island/Queens Congressman Tom Suozzi Announces Bid for N.Y. Governor

Rep. Tom Suozzi announced Monday that he is running for governor (Photo: Facebook)

Nov. 30, 2021 By Christian Murray

Congressman Tom Suozzi, who represents a portion of Northeast Queens and northern Long Island, announced Monday that he is officially running for governor in 2022.

Suozzi, who touts himself as a “common-sense Democrat,” will step down from his congressional seat at the end of next year in order to run for governor.

He made the announcement during a virtual press conference Monday.

“I’m running for governor of New York State,” Suozzi said, who currently represents New York’s 3rd congressional district. “I’m very excited about it…I’ve got the background and proven ability to do this job.”

Suozzi, 59, has long track record in government. He was the mayor of Glen Cove, a town on the north shore of Long Island, from 1994 to 2001; and was Nassau County Executive from 2002 to 2009.

He entered Congress in 2017, after winning the seat following the retirement of Steve Israel, a Democrat.

Suozzi is entering a crowded field that includes Gov. Kathy Hochul, state Attorney General Letitia James and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams. Mayor Bill de Blasio has also indicated that he may enter the race.

“I’m the only one with a proven executive experience. I’ve got a record of doing this stuff and getting stuff done,” Suozzi said during the press conference.

Rep. Tom Suozzi represents New York’s 3rd Congressional district. The district includes the Queens neighborhoods of Little Neck, Whitestone, Glen Oaks and Floral Park– as well as the northern section of Nassau County and a small portion of Suffolk County.

Suozzi is known for being a centrist.

In Congress, he has been an outspoken advocate calling for the full restoration of the deductibility of state and local taxes—known as SALT.

A $10,000 limit was placed on state and local tax deductions as part of former President Donald Trump’s tax reform measures in 2017. Many residents in high-tax states like New York have been hit hard by the change, since they are are no longer able to deduct the full value of their state/local taxes from their federal taxes.

The House of Representatives passed the Build Back Better Act earlier this month that raises the limit from $10,000 to $80,000. Critics of the increase, such as Democratic Socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders, argue that the deduction is a giveaway to the upper middle income and rich.

Suozzi also defied Democratic Socialists recently when he backed Byron Brown’s write in campaign for Buffalo mayor—against the Democratic nominee India Walton, a Democratic Socialist. Brown, who was the incumbent and a Democrat, won the race.

Suozzi will be stepping down from a congressional seat that is likely to be heavily contested next year.

He faced a competitive race in 2020 against an unknown Republican newcomer—32-year-old George Santos.

Suozzi trailed by more than 4,000 votes on the night of the election before winning by more than 46,000 votes when the absentee ballots and other votes were counted. Suozzi generated 209,000 votes to Santos’ 162,000.

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