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Manhattan Man Busted for Allegedly Stealing Funds From Flushing-Based Bowling League

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Oct. 26, 2022 By Christian Murray

A Manhattan man who was treasurer of a Queens bowling league has been charged with grand larceny and other crimes for allegedly stealing dues and prize money from members.

Robert Vickers, 59, who was part of the Ted Guy Memorial League that played at JIB Lanes in Flushing, was in charge of collecting weekly dues from the 120-member league in the 2019-2020 season to cover bowling expenses and prize money.

As treasurer, he was supposed to deposit the funds into a bank account in the league’s name and to disperse prize money to members based on league standings.

When the COVID-19 pandemic forced the season to prematurely end on March 11, 2020, team captains voted to pay out prize monies based on the team and individual standings for the first half of the season, and to return dues that had been paid in advance of the unplayed games.

Since that vote, team captains reported that Vickers had failed to pay out their team members, and Vickers claimed his account was frozen.

Records, however, indicated that Vickers used league funds to make expensive purchases and gamble funds at casinos in New York and Atlantic City, authorities said.

“As alleged, the defendant took advantage of not only his position in the league, but of a global pandemic to line his pockets with funds reserved for official league activities,” said Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz. “The defendant has been apprehended and faces serious charges.”

Vickers, who faces up to 4 years in prison, was arrested at his West 52nd Street home Tuesday. He has been ordered to return to court on Dec. 13.

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