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Mets Owner Steve Cohen Plans to Develop Space Around Citi Field, To Hold Visioning Session in January

The owner of the New York Mets is looking to develop 50 acres around Citi Field. The development would include everything from public space to entertainment (Photo courtesy of Queens Future)

Dec. 19, 2022 By Christian Murray

The owner of the New York Mets is looking to develop a 50-acre area around Citi Field and is holding a visioning session next month to get feedback as to how it should be done.

Steve Cohen, the hedge fund manager who purchased the Mets in 2020 for $2.4 billion, aims to “re-imagine the space around Citi Field” that currently consists of 50 acres of vacant asphalt. He says that the desolate space is wasted, and that it divides neighborhoods from one another—and is a barrier to the Flushing Bay waterfront.

Cohen said the visioning session will take place on Jan. 7 at Citi Field and it builds on discussions he has had with community groups and local leaders. To participate in the meeting, register here.

“For months, we have been listening to the local community who keeps telling us there is more they want from the area. Everyone agrees that the status quo isn’t acceptable,” Cohen said in a statement. “We are committed to putting forward a vision for the area that will create a shared space that people not only want to come to and enjoy, but can be proud of.”

The Willets Point District is east of the 50 acres that Steve Cohen is looking to develop. The EDC presented a map of the Willets Point District to Queens Community Board 7 in September.

Cohen said that his vision for the area includes creating dedicated open space for the public, including green space that the entire community can enjoy.

The plan would also help connect the surrounding neighborhoods to the waterfront and increase walkability and cycling access.

However, a major focus would be on bringing year-round entertainment to the area—turning it into an entertainment destination, with live music, restaurants, bars and possibly a casino. The plan would lead to the creation of thousands of jobs.

The 50 acres is separate from the city’s Willets Point redevelopment plan, where 2,500 affordable units and a soccer stadium are being built. Cohen’s 50 acres is west of the city’s planned development.

Cohen, when he purchased the team made it clear that he wanted to invest beyond the walls of Citi Field. For more information on the concept, please click here.

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