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MoMA PS1 to Reopen Sept. 17

MoMA PS1 (Google)

Aug. 28, 2020 By Allie Griffin

MoMA PS1 will officially reopen to the public next month after being closed for months due to the ongoing pandemic.

The museum will reopen Sept. 17 and feature a new outdoor commission by artist Rashid Johnson in its courtyard as well as a major exhibition on art and mass incarceration curated by Dr. Nicole R. Fleetwood.

The Long Island City art institution will have a number of COVID-19 regulations and CDC-recommended safety protocols in place and will also be open for extended evening hours in order to accommodate more visitors.

PS1 will be open from noon to 8 p.m. Thursday through Monday. Admission tickets can be booked online, beginning Sept. 10 for timed-entry and are free to all New York City residents.

“We are very happy to be able to welcome visitors back to the museum with new, enhanced
health and safety protocols to protect visitors and staff alike,” Director of
PS1, Kate Fowle said.

Temperature checks and face masks are required for all visitors over the age of two. PS1 also has free masks available for those without them.

Public visitations are limited to a maximum of 40 visitors per hour, well below 25 percent of the museum’s total capacity. Social distancing will be enforced throughout the museum and public spaces will be continuously cleaned and sanitized.

The opening exhibit “Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration” features work from more than 35 artists including art done by incarcerated people and pieces concerning state repression, erasure and imprisonment. It has been updated to reflect the growing COVID-19 crisis in U.S. prisons and will run through April 4, 2021.

“Our reopening program presents a new exhibition and commission, introducing new artists’ voices, presenting artwork that addresses some of the most pressing issues of our time, and offering opportunities for visitors to safely engage with artworks and each other — something that is very needed in this moment,” Fowle said.

MoMA PS1 will also launch a one-day edition of its music program Warm Up on Saturday, Sept. 5 which will be livestreamed from the museum courtyard both online and at outdoor venues across the city. It will feature 12 local DJ sets and live performances for eight hours of continuous music.

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