You are reading

Swastika Scratched Into Man’s Parked Car in Forest Hills, Incident Condemned by Electeds

(iStock)

July 7, 2020 By Allie Griffin

The NYPD is investigating an anti-Semitic act of vandalism in Forest Hills in which a swastika was carved into the hood of a parked car Thursday.

A 61-year-old man discovered a swastika scratched into the hood of his vehicle–and his two passenger side tires punctured– on July 3, after he parked it near 64th Road and 102nd Street a day earlier.

Local elected officials condemned the act of vandalism in the neighborhood, which has a large Jewish community.

“We are disgusted to learn about this reprehensible crime,” Congresswoman Grace Meng, State Sen. Toby Ann Stavisky, Assemblyman Andrew Hevesi and Councilwoman Karen Koslowitz said in a joint statement.

“While the owner of the vandalized vehicle may not have been Jewish, we cannot ignore the particular malice behind this incident – which occurred in an area that is home to one of the largest Jewish populations in New York City,” they said.

The officials said the NYPD Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating the incident and thanked the 112th Precinct for its swift response.

“Let there be no confusion: we stand together against any and all forms anti-Antisemitism, racism, bigotry, and hate – and we will maintain Queens’ standing as a borough that welcomes all, regardless of religion, race, sexual orientation, or gender identity,” they said.

email the author: [email protected]

3 Comments

Click for Comments 
Hateful Karen Ross

You post racist garbage all over the place? Why are you so full of hate Karen?

Reply
Sara Ross

That area is a large Russian community. The ones who drive nice cars, live in those ugly, disgusting structures, but yet pay with NYS benefit cards and get better medical insurance than people who actually pay for it.

Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Two-Wheel Traffic Up on Bridges, But Cash-Strapped City Can’t Expand Crowded Bike Lanes

Even with many New Yorkers staying home during the pandemic, growing legions of bicyclists are pedaling over the city-run East River bridges that link Queens and Brooklyn to Manhattan.

“It can get pretty tight up there at times,” Andre Figueroa, 19, of Astoria, said before riding into Manhattan over the Queensboro Bridge’s shared cyclist and pedestrian path. “Ever since the start of this pandemic, you’ve seen a real change when it comes to people bicycling.”