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Coronavirus Death Toll in Queens Nears 4,000

Elmhurst Hospital (QueensPost)

April 22, 2020 By Allie Griffin

The number of Queens residents killed by the coronavirus is inching towards 4,000, according to city data released today.

In total, 3,915 people have died from the virus in the World’s Borough as of yesterday evening, according to the city’s Department of Health. The figures consist of 3,002 people who tested positive prior to dying– and another 913 people who weren’t tested but COVID-19 was determined as the reason for their death.

Citywide, the virus had claimed the lives of 14,996 New Yorkers as of yesterday. More Brooklyn residents have died from contracting the coronavirus — 3,983 — than in any other borough.

However, Queens has had and continues to have the highest number of cases of the deadly disease. As of yesterday at 6 p.m., 42,637 borough residents tested positive for COVID-19. New York City as a whole has 138,435 cases.

Corona, which ironically shares the name of the devastating virus, continues to have the most cases among New York City neighborhoods.

As of 2:30 p.m. today, Corona has 2,946 positive cases of COVID-19.

Adjacent neighborhoods of Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, East Elmhurst and Woodside have 2,282 cases, 1,781 cases, 2,140 cases and 1,464 cases respectively.

Other neighborhoods with high counts include parts of Jamaica with 1,433 cases and Far Rockaway with 1,573 cases.

The map below shows the number of positive COVID-19 cases in each zip code across the five boroughs.

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