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Queens Public Library Reopens 12 Additional Branches With Limited Service

Hunters Point Library (Image: Queens Public Library)

Dec. 1, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

The Queens Public Library reopened an additional 12 branch locations Monday, taking the total number of branches open on a “to-go” basis in the borough to 35.

The latest branches to be added include the Hunters Point Library, the East Flushing Library and Elmhurst Library.

The 35 branches are all open on a “to-go” basis, where residents are able to request items online, through the QPL app or by phone. Members then have to pick up the items in a designated area of each branch building. The items can then be returned at exterior return machines.

Library visitors are not permitted to browse shelves or use public computers inside branch buildings. Public programming and events remain canceled amid the pandemic.

The library system is gradually reopening after shutting down all 66 of its branches on March 16 to stop the spread of COVID-19.

It started reopening branches on July 13, when seven branches opened on a to-go basis. These were followed by a second batch of eight branches on Aug. 10 with seven more branches reopening on Sep. 28.

All 35 branches that have reopened are operating six days a week on a to-go basis with a mask requirement in place for both visitors and staff.

The branches are open Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (with a one-hour closure from 1 to 2 p.m. for cleaning); Tuesdays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.; and on Thursdays from noon to 7 p.m. (with a one-hour closure from 3 to 4 p.m. for cleaning).

The 12 branches that opened Monday are Briarwood Library; East Flushing Library; Elmhurst Library; Glen Oaks Library; Hollis Library; Hunters Point Library; Lefrak Library; Maspeth Library; Mitchell-Linden Library; Richmond Hill Library; Rochdale Village Library and St. Albans Library.

They join the following branches that are currently open for “to-go” service:

Arverne Library; Astoria Library; Auburndale Library; Bayside Library; Bellerose Library; Cambria Heights Library; Central Library; East Elmhurst Library; Flushing Library; Forest Hills Library; Fresh Meadows Library; Hillcrest Library; Jackson Heights Library; Langston Hughes Library; Laurelton Library; Long Island City Library; Ozone Park Library; Peninsula Library; Queensboro Hill Library; Rego Park Library; Ridgewood Library; South Ozone Park Library and Whitestone Library.

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