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State Legislators Plan to Provide Undocumented Immigrants With Unemployment Benefits

Broadway in Elmhurst (Photo: Queens Post)

April 1, 2021 By Ryan Songalia

Undocumented immigrants and formerly incarcerated inmates in New York state could soon receive unemployment benefits that they had been ineligible for under earlier federal aid packages.

State Sen. Jessica Ramos, who represents a portion of western Queens, has been an outspoken advocated for the proposal known as the Excluded Workers Fund. On Wednesday, she took to Twitter, urging that it be included in the state budget.

“Every [New Yorker] should have access to the meaningful relief they need to provide for their families, regardless of documentation,” wrote Ramos.

Ramos was not immediately available for comment when the Queens Post reached out to her office this morning.

State legislators and the office of Gov. Andrew Cuomo are already discussing how the plan would be implemented, reported Politico on Tuesday.

Senate and Assembly Democrats have proposed $2.1 billion to be included for the Excluded Workers Fund, which would make some recipients eligible for more than $27,000 in relief.

Undocumented immigrants–and those who have been released from incarceration since October 2019 and therefore did not have the sufficient work history— would be eligible for unemployment benefits backdated to the time when the pandemic struck in March.

Benefits would include retroactive payments of $600 for each week they were unemployed from March 27 through July 2020, and $300 for each week from August 1, 2020 through September 6, 2021. Therefore, someone who has not worked the entirety of the pandemic would be eligible for an immediate payment of $20,700 and an additional $6,600.

“These are the folks who have been starving and have been on food lines on a daily basis, sometimes for hours, just to guarantee some food on the table for themselves and their families for the same night,” New York Immigration Coalition’s Vanessa Agudelo told Politico.

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6 Comments

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georgetheatheist

Is she nuts? 20 G’s for being here working illegally? When will this so-called “progressive” absolute lunacy stop?

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Publius

No room for fraud here. Working off the books, fake I.D’s, fake names, multiple names, Nigerian, Chinese and Russian hackers…And back benefits? Disgusting.

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Sara Ross

I know they work hard and work long hours to give their families a better life, but I just remember the stories my grandparents told me about coming here through Ellis Island on a ship (not first class either) and having to sit in the main hall for hours if not days waiting to be called and then having to take numerous physical and mental tests. They also had to have a job and a place to live. If they had a cold, they were sent back. The fees that ICE charges to even get a green card is outrageous and I always wondered where all of that money went or in whose pockets?

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dnl

WHAT in GOD’S NAME ARE THEY DOING TO OUR COUNTRY!!!! I have family members who lost their jobs at the beginning of this “so called” pandemic and were unable to get unemployment because one of them wasn’t at their job long enough!!!!!

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G

They don’t pay taxes yet get government money back… that’s totally ridiculous….and the benefits won’t be taxed hiw is that fair?????

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