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Stop & Shop Completes Revamp of Maspeth and Glendale Stores

Stop & Shop had a ribbon cutting at its Maspeth store Friday to celebrate its upgrade (Photo courtesy of Stop & Shop)

Oct. 11, 2022 By Max Murray

Stop & Shop has remodeled its Maspeth and Glendale stores and is now offering more multicultural products as part of the supermarket chain’s $140 million capital investment across its 25 New York City operations.

A ribbon cutting was held at its 74-17 Grand Ave. store in Maspeth Friday, while a similar celebration will take place at its 64-66 Myrtle Ave. location in Glendale on Oct. 14.

Both stores offer customers a refreshed look, and new amenities that seek to enhance the customer-shopping experience and better meet the needs of the diverse areas they serve.

At the heart of Stop & Shop’s enhancements is an expanded product assortment that caters to the diverse neighborhood that each store serves.

For the Maspeth store, this means more than 1,500 additional multicultural products including new and unique Asian items, such as J-Basket Boba Kits and Lotte Choco Pies, as well as an elevated assortment of Latin dairy and grocery items with brands like El Exquisito Sabor desserts and Van Camps canned fish and expanded Halal options.

At the Glendale store, shoppers will notice an aisle that will be a multicultural destination with nearly 1,000 new ethnic products including Latin dairy offerings, as well as Puerto Rican & Caribbean products such as Kikuet Empanadillas, Rovira Export Crackers, and Tropical cheeses & dairy.

The revamped stores include signage with iconography to help non-native English speakers better understand what’s in each aisle; an expanded deli assortment including grab-and-go meal solutions; expanded meat, seafood and frozen food departments; an enhanced produce department; a remodeled bakery; and more organic and natural products throughout the stores.

Both stores will also have a renewed focus on value, offering more sale bins and special deals on culturally relevant products.

The stores continue to offer Pickup, providing customers with a faster and more convenient way to shop.

“Our customers are thrilled by the enhancements we’ve made at the stores so far, especially the expanded ethnic products,” said Al Steiger, Stop & Shop District Director. “Queens is the most ethnically diverse borough in New York City and we’re proud to bring products from around the world to the ‘world’s borough.’”

To commemorate the remodels, Stop & Shop donated $2,500 to Queens Center for Progress, one of Stop & Shop’s longtime partners in inclusion. QCP assists children and adults who have developmental disabilities, providing services to support independence, community involvement, and quality of life. Stop & Shop works closely with QCP, employing many of its clients at its stores.

Stop & Shop began operating in New York City more than two decades ago and currently operates 25 stores in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island – and home delivery in all five boroughs. Stop & Shop currently operates 11 stores in Queens, employing more than 1,400 local associates. Stop & Shop will continue to remodel its New York City stores over the next two years.

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anon

Yeah “remodel”, while abandoning their 48th store! The ONLY “Stop & Shop” in ASTORIA, that was a short walk for younger types and a short bus ride on the Q104 for the older types. The ONLY grocier store that had affordable organic multi cultural foods for everyone. Those with a car will go further out to those “newly remodeled” stores, taking the chance with crime risen EVERYWHERE and more gas $$$ in the car to get their, and since it’s further from Astoria it will take hours longer to haul it back home. For everyone spouting about “climate change”, you would think they would frown on the extra fumes from cars being forced to make the extra long distance ride to and back, just to be able to afford to eat. But those of us WITHOUT a car, you just gave us the 1 finger salute! Thanks Alot! By taking the 48th st store away, you are plainly telling 20+yrs loyal custoners to go take a “hike” literally.😡
We all have the right to afforable healthy groceries without further endangering ourselves with crazy “green girl gangs”, repeat criminal offenders on the lose AGAIN or just a drugged out teen/”adulting is HARD over 30″types just going into a rage while simultaneously beating up random strangers cause YOUR BREATHING (ie stop it…They don’t like that,…😵) So thanks for abandoning loyal customers who’s only crime is not owning a car! 😕

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