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Meng Wants Grocery Stores to Allocate Special Delivery Slots for Seniors and Vulnerable

Congresswoman Grace Meng, provided by Office of Congresswoman Grace Meng

April 22, 2020 By Michael Dorgan

Congresswoman Grace Meng has called on grocery stores to allocate special delivery slots for senior citizens and other vulnerable members of the community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Shopping at stores during COVID-19 can put the lives of at-risk residents in danger and the move would limit their exposure to the virus, Meng said in a statement Wednesday.

Meng wants supermarkets and online retailers to open up designated delivery time slots for vulnerable people to limit them from traveling outdoors.

Many seniors and vulnerable Queens residents have been unable to secure delivery slots due to a surge in demand for home deliveries as people look to avoid large crowds and long lines at supermarkets.

Meng said that while home deliveries are usually used for convenience, they have become a necessity for the elderly and the immunocompromised during the coronavirus pandemic.

“For many though, going outside is a risk too great to take; either they are physically unable to leave their homes, or the outside exposure can further endanger their lives, Meng said.

“Prioritizing deliveries for seniors and those living with disabilities would be the right thing to do, and it would help ensure that these vulnerable populations stay safe,” she said.

Several stores have already implemented reserved shopping hours for senior citizens and at-risk customers in order to help them avoid waiting in line for prolonged periods of time.

However, Meng urged them to expand on this service by implementing home delivery slots immediately.

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