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Senator Addabbo Looking for Solution to Get Farmers’ Food Surplus to Hungry New Yorkers

State Sen. Joseph Addabbo (Photo: NY Senate)

April 23, 2020 By Allie Griffin

State Senator Joseph Addabbo is searching for a solution to get farmers’ excess food to hungry New Yorkers.

U.S. farmers have been forced to destroy millions of pounds of crops and produce that they would have sold to now shuttered restaurants, hotels and schools, reports show.

Meanwhile, thousands of New Yorkers are out of work and struggling to pay for food because of the COVID-19 related closures.

Addabbo hopes to find a way to fix both problems by putting New York farmers and food suppliers in touch with local pantries and distributors that serve communities in need of food.

“It hurts to know that so many of my constituents are food insecure during this pandemic, while millions of pounds of food and dairy products are going to waste each day,” Addabbo said.

The senator sent a letter to the Commissioner of the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets inquiring if New York farmers have been forced to destroy excess food.

“We need to find the means necessary that will provide our state’s farmers with resources and contacts to get their food and dairy surplus to the people that need it the most,” he said.

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