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Take a Walking Tour Around Flushing Creek, Learn About Its History, Pollution and Future Development

Flushing Creek (Photo: Dept. of City Planning)

May 24, 2021 By Christina Santucci

An artist and member of the Guardians of Flushing Bay – a coalition of community members, environmentalists and non-motorized boaters – will lead a walking tour of the area around Flushing Creek next month.

The event is scheduled to take place June 19 from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m., starting at the Mets-Willets Point subway station.

Cody Herrmann will guide participants on a two-mile walk through Willets Point to Flushing Creek – a one-mile-long waterway with Willets Point to the west and Flushing to the east that ends in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Attendees will discuss water quality, local history and plans for new developments in Willets Point and downtown Flushing.

Flushing Creek (GMaps)

In Willets Point, the city is finalizing a deal to lease six acres of land to Queens Development Group, LLC – a joint venture between Stephen Ross’ Related Companies and Sterling Equities, a real estate company that previously owned the Mets.

Plans include construction of 1,100 affordable apartments, public open space and a new public elementary school.

Meanwhile, the City Council voted to approve zoning changes in December for a special waterfront district in Flushing – alongside Flushing Creek – which would include 1,725 apartments, 879 hotel rooms, office and retail space, as well as a brand new road network. A coalition of Flushing-based community groups, however, has filed a lawsuit against several city agencies and the City Council over the plan.

Next month’s walking tour is being held in conjunction with the Guardians of Flushing Bay and Queens Museum’s exhibition, “Art As Social Action: 10 Years of Social Practice Queens.”

Hermann is one of several artists whose work is included in the exhibit, which emphasizes the intersection of art and social justice and runs through July 25. She is also an activist and a board member and chair of the community engagement committee with the Guardians of Flushing Bay.

Organizers of the walking tour noted that masks and close-toed shoes are required for attendees. Parts of the route will include areas with uneven and sandy ground.

Attendance is limited to 25 people, and registration is first come, first served.

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